JPR Williams: a revolutionary, a fighter and the ultimate competitor | Paul Rees

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The foresight of a primary school teacher in Wales helped to create one of the best attacking full-backs of the 1970s

JPR Williams described himself as a diehard Corinthian, but he was also a revolutionary. When he made his debut for Wales against Scotland in 1969, it was in a position then regarded as the last line of defence. Only 15 tries had been scored by full-backs in major Test matches in 88 years, but the former British junior tennis champion changed the dynamic and smoothed the way for players such as Andy Irvine, Serge Blanco and John Gallagher.

Williams, who qualified as an orthopaedic surgeon while playing for London Welsh, scored six tries in his 55 internationals for Wales, five against England, an opponent he boasted a 100% success rate against in 11 Tests. He was qualified to wear the white jersey as his mother, Margaret, was born in Rochdale, but there was never the remotest chance of a boy born and raised in the Bridgend area turning his back on his homeland.

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Written by Paul Rees
This news first appeared on https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2024/jan/09/jpr-williams-a-revolutionary-a-fighter-and-the-ultimate-competitor-wales-rugby-union under the title “JPR Williams: a revolutionary, a fighter and the ultimate competitor | Paul Rees”. Bolchha Nepal is not responsible or affiliated towards the opinion expressed in this news article.